Faculty and Staff Guidelines

Oregon State University is committed to providing equal opportunity to higher education for academically qualified students without regard to a disability. Students and Faculty at Oregon State University are encouraged to become familiar with their rights and responsibilities.

The Faculty of OSU is committed to the retention of students while promoting academic success. Students are recruited to the university with the understanding that the Faculty is responsive to their needs and will provide reasonable accommodations. Providing reasonable accommodations is a cooperative effort between OSU Faculty and Disability Access Services (DAS).

These guidelines are designed to help OSU Faculty understand how accommodations work and what parts of the accommodation process they are responsible for. The information in this guide is separated into chapters based on accommodation type. A table of contents is available at the bottom of the page, and in the right-hand navigation menu.



General Information

Disability Access Services (DAS)

Disability Access Services (DAS) has the responsibility for administering, reviewing, maintaining, and supervising a variety of support procedures and services for students in accordance with state and federal laws. When appropriate, DAS provides oral and sign language interpreters, note takers, taped textbooks, assistance in working with instructors, or equipment loans. Instruction in the OSU physical activity program, reading rooms for students with visual disabilities, and keys for elevator operation are available to students as needed. Faculty and DAS staff work cooperatively to decide when adjustments to academic requirements, testing formats and substitution of classes may be necessary.

Non-Discrimination Policy

Federal and state laws prohibit discrimination on the basis of disability. For a copy of university policy and guidelines, contact the Office of Equal Opportunity and Access at 541-737-3556. It is the intent of the University Advisory Committee for Persons with Disabilities (UACPD) that Faculty of OSU go beyond legal requirements in fostering an atmosphere of enhanced learning. The President established the UACPD as an advisory committee to recommend policy and procedures on disability issues.

Student Responsibilities

From their initial contact with OSU, students with disabilities who need accommodations should contact the DAS office. It is the student's responsibility to acquire information concerning technological accommodations, resources on campus for parking, housing services and Student Health Services. Students are responsible for providing documentation, making timely requests for services and communicating with their professors regarding accommodations specific to the course.

Documentation of Disability

Assistance is available to students whose disabilities have been documented by the appropriate professional and in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. Disability verification is solely the responsibility of the DAS office. The student is responsible for providing appropriate documentation. Faculty should not be involved in the process of documenting a disability. As a faculty member, you can assist students by directing them to DAS's resources, thereby easing the student's adjustment and assuring a more positive early university experience. If you do receive a letter from DAS, the student's disability has been documented.

Faculty and Staff Responsibilities

Class Syllabus

Please be sure that your syllabus contains this statement:

Accommodations for students with disabilities are determined and approved by Disability Access Services (DAS). If you, as a student, believe you are eligible for accommodations but have not obtained approval please contact DAS immediately at 541-737-4098 or at http://ds.oregonstate.edu. DAS notifies students and faculty members of approved academic accommodations and coordinates implementation of those accommodations. While not required, students and faculty members are encouraged to discuss details of the implementation of individual accommodations.

Please bring the DAS syllabus statement to the attention your students at the first class meeting.

Notification Email from DAS

Faculty will receive an email from DAS identifying appropriate accommodations for the student. Please review the email, submit any requested information, and consider the impact of the accommodations in the context of your class. Discuss any questions or concerns you have with our office.

Confidentiality

Information concerning a student's disability should be disclosed only to those with a legitimate "need to know." Sharing of information with other faculty and staff needs to be balanced with the student's interest while maintaining their privacy. Further disclosure should only be made with the express permission of the student or in consultation with appropriate DAS staff. Please do not discuss a student's disability or need for accommodations in front of other students.

Web Access

All course web pages must be constructed in an accessible format. Web pages need to be accessible across multiple platforms (text-to-speech software, screen readers, screen enlargers etc.). If media is embedded into pages, descriptive text or captioning must also be provided. Making Web pages accessible is easier than many might think and usually only takes up little time. OSU has accessibility guidelines for everyone to follow. They are available at http://oregonstate.edu/accessibility/. For assistance regarding Web page accessibility, please contact Disability.Services@oregonstate.edu.

Updated 04/2016

Accessible Formats

Accessible Formats are course materials including textbooks, documents, exams, handouts, etc., converted into various accessible MS Word documents, PDF’s, Braille, etc.

Faculty will receive a Notification of Academic Accommodation email from Disability Access Services (DAS) when eligible students have requested accessible format accommodations. If a student addresses faculty directly with a request for accessible formats, please direct the student to contact the DAS Office.

When accessible format conversions require substantial time to prepare, faculty will be asked to provide the class syllabus well in advance of the term.

When a new textbook is selected, ask the publisher if the textbook is available in electronic text (E-text). If the choice is between two textbooks of comparable content, and only one of these is available in E-text, the fully accessible textbook should be selected.

If the E-text format is unavailable, request a desk copy from the publisher for DAS to convert into an accessible format. DAS will donate the book to the Valley Library.

It is important to remember that some of the supplemental materials might not be accessible to all students.

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact:

Assistive Technology Manager
Alt.Format@oregonstate.edu
541-737-3666

Updated 09/2015

Alternative Testing

Alternative Testing Procedures

Students request alternative testing accommodations any time after registering for classes. After the students’ requests are approved, faculty will receive a Notification of Academic Accommodations email with a link to submit an Alternative Testing Agreement. The Alternative Testing Agreement identifies all of the information that students, faculty and DAS need to know about administering testing accommodations – whether the faculty member or DAS will be proctoring the exam and providing the accommodations, where the exam will be taken, and what the exam instructions are.

Timing for Alternative Testing Requests

Requests for alternative testing services made too close to the exam time may impose undue administrative burden. DAS generally requires one week's notice to arrange alternative testing unless there are exceptional circumstances beyond the control of the student. If a student approaches you for accommodations, please inquire if they have registered with DAS and refer them if they have not. You may wish to indicate that you need to receive a letter for alternative testing from DAS to assist in determining appropriate accommodations.

DAS is committed to providing fair and appropriate testing accommodations for eligible students.

Students are not required to use eligible accommodations. It is their choice whether or not to use approved accommodations in a course. Therefore, students are responsible for requesting alternative testing accommodations through their DAS Online Services account. Accommodation requests can be made any time after registering for a class until the seventh week of a term and are not retroactive. Requests made after the seventh week of the term will be implemented for the following term.

Testing Agreements

After the students’ requests are approved, faculty will receive a Notification of Academic Accommodations email with a link to submit an Alternative Testing Agreement. The Alternative Testing Agreement identifies all of the information that students, faculty and DAS need to know about administering testing accommodations – whether the faculty member or DAS will be proctoring the exam and providing the accommodations, where the exam will be taken, and what the exam instructions are. A Testing Agreement is needed for all courses except Ecampus. 

Faculty are not required to submit more than one Alternative Testing Agreement per course section. DAS can copy an Alternative Testing Agreement to multiple courses or sections upon request. If an Alternative Testing Agreement is not submitted within two business days of receiving the Notification of Academic Accommodations, then students will be directed to follow up with their faculty member to discuss their accommodations.

If no Alternative Testing Agreement is submitted, the faculty member is responsible for providing all of the students’ testing accommodations.

Effective July 1, 2015 departments may be charged a fee for DAS to proctor exams at a faculty provided location. A fee of $30 per exam for the first two hours and $12 for each additional hour will be charged to the faculty members’ department if the exam does not require lab materials.

After the faculty member submits an Alternative Testing Agreement, students who use DAS as their proctor must schedule their exams through DAS Online Services. Exam requests must be submitted according to the course syllabus and DAS scheduling deadlines. If a student has an Alternative Testing Agreement without a scheduled exam, we will presume the student has decided to take the exam with the rest of the class and without accommodations.

Faculty Need To Know:

  • DAS Testing Services offers proctoring in Testing Centers on the Corvallis campus and at OSU-Cascades are equip to provide alternative testing accommodations for both on campus and Ecampus courses.
  • You are responsible for providing extended time accommodations for exams in Canvas.
  • You are not required to submit more than one Alternative Testing Agreement per course section.
  • The Testing Agreement you submit will automatically be applied to all eligible students in that course section and can be copied to multiple courses or sections at your request.
  • If changes need to be made to a Testing Agreement contact DAS Testing Services at testing.services@oregonstate.edu or 541-737-8970.
  • If an Alternative Testing Agreement is not submitted the professor is responsible for providing all of their students’ testing accommodations

Students Need To Know:

  • DAS Testing Centers on the Corvallis Campus and at OSU-Cascades can provide alternative testing accommodations for both on campus and Ecampus courses.
  • Students should follow up with their professor if a Testing Agreement is not in their DAS Online Services account after the beginning of the term and/or more than two business days after submitting the request.
    Exception - A testing Agreement is not needed for Ecampus courses. Instead, students must submit an Ecampus Exam and Proctoring Form
  • After faculty submit an Alternative Testing Agreement for DAS to proctor exams, students are responsible for scheduling their exams with a DAS Testing Center.
  • If a student with a DAS proctor testing agreement does not submit and exam request with a DAS Testing Center we will presume the student has decided to take the exam with the rest of the class and without accommodations.

Ecampus Exams

After students request their accommodations each term via DAS Online Services, Ecampus as well as faculty are notified of any testing accommodations. If there is an issue with this please contact your instructor and Ecampus immediately.

Ecampus students who need proctored exams on campus must select DAS as the proctor on the Ecampus "Exams and Proctoring Form" located on the Ecampus web site, in order to take exams with DAS.

Allow at least 48 hours before scheduling exams at a DAS Testing Center. Ecampus students must also follow DAS procedures and timelines for scheduling exams.

Ecampus students who need proctored exams outside of the Corvallis area must also complete the Ecampus Exam and Proctoring Form located on the Ecampus web site, indicating their selected proctor in their area. After this is completed, Ecampus will inform the proctor of any relevant testing accommodations.

DAS Proctored Exams

Corvallis Testing Center

After faculty submit an Alternative Testing Agreement for DAS to proctor exams, students are responsible for scheduling exams through their DAS Online Services account. Exam requests must be submitted according to the course syllabus and DAS scheduling deadlines. Students are responsible for scheduling DAS proctored exams within Testing Services exam request deadlines.

Effective July 1, 2015 departments may be charged a fee for DAS to proctor exams at a faculty provided location. If the exam does not require lab materials a fee of $30 per exam for the first two hours and $12 for each additional hour will be charged to the faculty members’ department.

OSU-Cascades Testing Center

After faculty submit an Alternative Testing Agreement for DAS to proctor exams. Students should then contact Diane Pritchard at diane.pritchard@osucascades.edu (email) or at 541-322-2023 (voice) to schedule exams with OSU Cascades Testing Proctoring Services..

If a Testing Agreement is not submitted by faculty we will assume they are providing all of their students’ alternative testing accommodations.

Faculty Proctored Exams

Faculty Need to Know:

  • We suggest showing your students any testing locations you plan to provide before submitting the testing agreement to ensure it will meet their individual accommodation needs.
  • Students have the right to take exam at DAS Testing Centers if the testing location you provide does not meet their accommodation needs.
  • You can make adjustments to your Testing Agreements by contacting DAS Testing Services at testing.services@oregonstate.edu or 541-737-8970.

Students Need To Know:

  • A Testing Agreement is NOT needed for Ecampus courses; you must submit DAS as your proctor on your Ecampus Exam and Proctoring Form at least 48 hours before scheduling an Ecampus exam at a DAS Testing Center.
  • We suggest reviewing faculty provided testing locations prior to exams to ensure they will meet your testing accommodation needs.
  • You have the right to take exams at DAS Testing Centers if a faculty provided testing location does not meet your individual testing needs.
  • If a faculty provided testing location does not meet your accommodation needs, communicate this to your professor first and then notify DAS so adjustments can be made with enough time for you to meet Testing Center scheduling deadlines for future exams.
  • Adjustments in Testing Agreements are not retroactive.

Accommodation Descriptions

DAS is committed to reasonable testing accommodations for eligible students. Exam accommodations are determined on a case-by-case basis and may include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Quiet location
  • Extended time
  • Accessible Format
  • Computer Screen Reader
  • Computer Word Processor
  • Computer Speech to Text
  • Calculator
  • Spell checker
  • Reader
  • Scribe
  • Wheelchair Access
  • Accessible Furniture
  • Music
  • Memory Aid

 

Accessible Formats

Accessible Formats are exam materials converted into various accessible MS Word documents, PDF’s, Braille, etc.

Computer Screen Reader

Computer Screen Reader is software providing text in an audio format. Exams must be provided in an accessible PDF to provide computer screen reader accommodations.

Computer Speech to Text

Computer Speech to Text is software to transcribe a student’s speech into a text document. Students speak directly into a microphone to create a text document. The software does not provide any assistance with grammar, spelling, or punctuation, the student is responsible for editing the document as needed via speech or keyboard controls.

Readers

Readers will only read what is on the printed page and cannot be asked to interpret, define, explain or reword questions. They may, however, repeat information when asked. Students are responsible for communicating with the reader about their needs for tone, rate, etc.

Scribes

Scribes will write down verbatim what students have dictated. The scribe is not responsible for organizing or paraphrasing students' words, or for correcting grammar and punctuation. Students may request at any time to review what the scribe has written, either by reading it or asking the scribe to read it aloud.

Music

Students eligible for the accommodation of music during exams are allowed to use a hand-held music device with headphones. If exams take place at the DAS Testing Center in Corvallis, DAS will provide the music device while holding the student’s ID card as collateral; students are not allowed to use their own devices. If exams are proctored by faculty, music devices should be discussed between the student and the faculty member at the start of the term.

Memory Aid

Memory aids provide assistance to students with documented deficits in rote memory, sequencing memory, working memory and/or long term memory to recall information that would otherwise be inaccessible to them in a testing environment situation.

The memory aid allows the student to demonstrate knowledge of course material without taxing already compromised memory function.

A proper memory aid will not be useful to the student unless the student knows and understands how to use the information it refers to. If the student doesn’t understand the course material, a proper memory aid will not help.

The memory aid allows the student to demonstrate knowledge of course material by helping to trigger the student’s memory.

If the purpose of a test is to determine whether or not the student knows specific definitions, having those words or definitions on a Memory Aid would make it an answer sheet and therefor, not acceptable. If the definitions were written but not connected to the terms to be defined in any way, this may be allowable, since it will trigger the student’s memory of the correct term. Ideally a memory aid would only make sense to the specific student that is using it.

Process
  • When students are approved through DAS to utilize a memory aid, it is the students responsibility to build the memory aid.
  • The memory aid is then turned into the professor or faculty member for approval before the exam. This must be done in a reasonable amount of time so the faculty member can then forward the memory aid to DAS.
  • Once the memory aid has been approved by the faculty member/professor, the faculty member/professor will then distribute that to the DAS Testing Center/Ecampus to be administered with the exam.
What do they look like?

Memory aids can contain acronyms, short phrases, pictures, schematic diagrams or mind maps, names, definitions, tables, charts or key terms and certain formulae. Styles of memory aids may vary. Generally, they can be written or typed, 10 or 12 font, on a large index card, OR up to one side of an 8 ½” x 11” sheet of paper.

A memory aid is only allowed in the testing environment at the DAS Testing Center if it was sent in by the faculty member.

Memory Aids are not:

  • Full course notes
  • Answer sheets
  • Substitutes for studying
  • Open textbooks


Spell Checker

To view the full policy on reasonable accommodations for spell checker, please visit http://ds.oregonstate.edu/sites/ds.oregonstate.edu/files/documents/spell....

Calculator

To view the full policy on reasonable accommodations for calculator, please visit http://ds.oregonstate.edu/sites/ds.oregonstate.edu/files/documents/calcu....

Please contact Testing Services at Testing.Services@oregonstate.edu or call the main DAS office at 541-737-4098 for more information.

Testing Services Policies

Testing Center Hours of Operation

DAS Testing Centers operate Monday through Friday during academic terms, and will proctor both on-campus and Ecampus exams for eligible students. An eligible student is defined as any OSU student registered with DAS and eligible for alternative testing accommodations. Students are responsible for scheduling their exams within testing center timelines to ensure adequate space, staffing, and accommodations are available. Exams outside of testing center operating hours will be scheduled as close as possible to the class exam time within operating hours.

Testing centers operate on a first-come, first-served basis and do not accept walk-ins.

  • Bend (OSU-Cascades) DAS Testing Center hours of operation are 8 a.m.–5 p.m.
    • Exams must be completed during operating hours and end prior to 5 p.m.
  • Corvallis DAS Testing Center hours of operation are 8 a.m.–10:30 p.m.
    • Exams must be completed during operating hours and end prior to 10:30 p.m.
    • Finals week - Corvallis DAS Testing Center hours are 7:30 a.m.–11 p.m.

ID Requirements

  • A valid photo ID must be presented at the time of testing.
  • If valid photo ID is not presented a photo of the student will be taken and emailed to the instructor for verification.

During Testing

  • Only authorized testing materials are allowed in the testing rooms. All personal items must be stored in designated areas.
  • Prohibited items in the testing room include, but are not limited to:
    • Cellular phones, pagers, or other electronic devices
    • Watches (effective September 1, 2015)
    • Hats, jackets
    • Bags, backpacks, purses
  • Exam rooms are monitored by staff and equipped with security mirrors.
  • Tests will not be administered beyond the scheduled exam time and deadlines set by the instructor.
  • Once the exam begins, students are not allowed to leave the testing center for any reason.
  • Test takers are responsible for monitoring their exam time; a clock or a 15 minute warning is available if requested prior to beginning the exam.

Academic Integrity

The OSU student code of conduct provisions regarding disruptive behavior and/or academic dishonesty applies to both classroom exams and exams administered at Testing Services locations. DAS has the right to stop an exam at any time if a violation is observed, including use of unauthorized materials or resources during an exam. All violations will be reported to faculty and may also be reported to OSU Student Conduct and result in a suspension of testing services.

These include but are not limited to:

  • Having prohibited items in the testing room
  • Going beyond the allotted testing time
  • Accessing unauthorized materials during exams
  • Giving or receiving help from others

Please refer to Academic Regulation 15 in the Online Catalog for Oregon State University's policies on Honesty in Academic Work.

Lateness

  • If a student is late for any reason, the student forfeits the missed time; no additional time will be granted to make up for the student's late arrival.
  • Proctors will only wait up to 20 minutes before determining that the student is a no-show.

Rescheduling

  • If students fail to show up for any reason, the test will be returned to the instructor.
  • If your instructor allows you to reschedule an exam, forward their written permission to Testing.Services@oregonstate.edu for Testing Services to consider the request.

Corvallis Campus Only:

  • If rescheduling an exam prior to the scheduled exam date, students can request a modification of the original exam request through their DAS Online Services account (this action is required if an instructor changes an exam date).
  • Students are responsible for submitting exam cancellations via DAS Online Services if:
    • they decide to take the exam in class and without accommodations
    • the exam was cancelled
    • they withdraw from the class

Testing Services Procedures

DAS is committed to providing fair and appropriate testing accommodations for eligible students. Any student observed utilizing any unauthorized materials or resources during an exam will be reported to faculty. DAS has the right to stop an exam at any time if academic dishonesty is witnessed. Please refer to Academic Regulation 15 in the Online Catalog for Oregon State University's policies on Honesty in Academic Work. Academic dishonesty may also result in the suspension of alternative testing services through DAS.

Corvallis DAS Testing Center

  • DAS sends an email to students and faculty two business days prior to each scheduled exam, identifying the location where the test will be held.
  • Faculty - Emailed exams can be sent to testing.services@oregonstate.edu and need to be received at least 24 hours in advance.

Scheduling Exams

  • After faculty submits a DAS Proctor @ DAS Location Testing Agreement students have access to schedule DAS proctored exams through their Online Services account
  • Students are responsible for scheduling exams through DAS Online Services at the group exam time and at least five business days in advance for midterms, ten business days for finals.
  • Appointments are required to ensure testing space and proctors are available
  • DAS assigns all testing rooms based on student accommodations and availability of testing space.
  • Students are not permitted to choose or change their exam rooms. DAS cannot guarantee a specific testing location.

Testing

  • Students should arrive on time and be prepared to take their exam at the identified time. Additional study time is not allowed, nor is additional time added for students arriving late, or for students who do not finish within the allotted timeframe.
  • Students are required to present photo identification before each exam.
  • The proctor will review the exam instructions with the student, including time and materials allowed (i.e. note card, calculator). All other materials, such as cell phones, backpacks, purses, jackets, caps, electronic devices, watches, and other personal items will be collected by the proctor.
  • Once the exam begins, students are not allowed to leave the testing site for any reason.
  • No additional time is added to exams when students take breaks.
  • When the scheduled exam time is up, the proctor will place the completed exam in a DAS testing envelope, seal it, and the student will sign over the seal. The completed exam will be delivered to the faculty member by DAS, for grading.

OSU-Cascades DAS Testing Center

  • After students request accommodations online with DAS each term, their faculty must submit an Alternative Testing Agreement for DAS to proctor exams.
  • If a Testing Agreement is not submitted by faculty they are responsible for providing all of the students’ alternative testing accommodations.

Scheduling Exams

Testing

  • Students should arrive on time and be prepared to take their exam at the identified time. Additional study time is not allowed, nor is additional time added for students arriving late, or for students who do not finish within the allotted timeframe.
  • The proctor will review the exam instructions with the student, including time and materials allowed (i.e. note card, calculator). All other materials, such as cell phones, backpacks, purses, jackets, caps, electronic devices, watches, and other personal items will be collected by the proctor.
  • Once the exam begins, students are not allowed to leave the testing site for any reason.
  • No additional time is added to exams when students take breaks.
  • When the scheduled exam time ends the exam will be collected and emailed to faculty.

Pop Quizzes

Pop quizzes can be scheduled with DAS. If faculty would like to partner with DAS Testing Services to provide accommodations for pop quizzes please contact DAS Alternative Testing Services so arrangements can be made.

Late Exam Requests

  • Exam requests submitted after the posted deadlines are late and will be considered on a case-by-case basis as space permits.
  • Students may submit late exam requests via DAS Online Services.
  • There is no guarantee that late exam requests will be accommodated.
  • Unless an email confirmation that testing space is still available is received from DAS, students should plan on taking the exam with the rest of the class and without accommodations.
  • If DAS is unable to accommodate a late exam request, it is unreasonable to expect the faculty member to provide it.
  • Upon submitting a late exam request, students may be required to attend an academic coaching session with a DAS staff member.

Late For an Exam

If a student is late for a scheduled exam for any reason, the student forfeits the missed time; no additional time will be granted to make up for the student's late arrival. Proctors will wait up to 20 minutes before determining that the student is a "no show."

No Show

If students fail to show up for an exam for any reason, the test will be returned immediately to faculty. Students are responsible for seeking faculty permission to reschedule any missed exams, before DAS will consider the request. The student must forward their faculty member’s written permission to Testing.Services@oregonstate.edu for the Corvallis Testing Center or Diane.pritchard@oregonstate.edu for the OSU Cascades Testing Center as well as coordinate rescheduling the exam for a day and time agreeable to all parties (the student, the faculty member, and DAS). There is no guarantee that the faculty member will permit a makeup exam.

Illness and Other Reschedule Requests

If students are ill or need to reschedule exams for any other reason, they will need to obtain their faculties written permission, and forward it to Testing.Services@oregonstate.edu for the Corvallis DAS Testing Center or Diane.pritchard@oregonstate.edu for the OSU Cascades DAS Testing Center before DAS will consider the request. There is no guarantee that the faculty member will permit a rescheduled exam.

Corvallis Campus Only

If an exam needs to be rescheduled prior to the exam date, students may submit their exam modification request via DAS Online Services. First, however, they should review their copy of the DAS Alternative Testing Agreement to determine what flexibility, if any, the faculty member has approved for scheduling exams. If the reschedule request falls outside the parameters of the DAS Alternative Testing Agreement, students must forward faculty’s written permission to testing.services@oregonstate.edu for DAS to consider the request.

Cancellations

If exam requests with DAS need to be cancelled for any reason, students are responsible for submitting the cancellation via DAS Online Services for the Corvallis Testing Center or email to Diane.pritchard@oregonstate.edu for the OSU Cascades Testing Center, in advance of the scheduled exam. This includes cancellations when students decide to take the exam in class, when the class exam was cancelled by faculty, or when the student drops or withdraws from the class.

Contact DAS Testing Services at 541-737-8970 (voice) or Testing.Services@oregonstate.edu (email) if you have questions or need additional information.

Updated 09/2015

Deaf and Hard of Hearing Access Services

Working with Students who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

If a student who is Deaf, hard of hearing, or has an auditory processing disorder is in class, the “Notice of Academic Accommodation” email from Disability Access Services will list the accommodations that are appropriate for the student.  Among these are:

Additional information about each of the listed accommodations can be found by clicking the links above.

There are several teaching techniques that are helpful for students with a hearing loss in your class. These include:

  • Ensuring that lighting is adequate for the student to be able to see the interpreters.
  • Avoiding standing with your back to light sources (such as windows). Doing so can create shadows on the face and prevents the student from speech-reading.
  • Avoiding speaking while facing away from the class; avoiding covering the mouth and face with papers, books, hands, etc.
  • Providing copies of overheads, PowerPoints, and other visual aids to the student in advance. A student watching an interpreter or a transcriber's computer screen cannot simultaneously see the material that you reference in class.
  • Providing Disability Access Services information about media that you plan to use. A captioned copy will be provided for use when a student with a hearing loss is present in the class.
  • Requesting an interpreter or transcriber for meetings with the student if such is necessary to ensure communication access. Fill out a Request for Interpreter or Transcriber form or contact DHOH.services@oregonstate.edu, preferably at least 24 hours in advance.
  • Striving to minimize background/environmental noises.
  • Using written notes to communicate with the student when interpreters or transcribers are unavailable.

For additional information, please contact the Manager of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Access Services: DHOH.services@oregonstate.edu or 541-737-3670

Page Updated 11/2014

Real-Time Transcribing

Real-time transcribing is a method of using specialized software to convert spoken language into text onto any device with a web browser and internet access.

If electronic devices are not allowed in the classroom, please be aware that students eligible for transcribing must use an electronic device with internet to receive their accommodation.

  • Lecture material, class comments, questions, and social interactions among the student's peers are all transcribed. The transcriber captures both the meaning and style of what is said.
  • The text from the transcriber is not "word-for word." The transcriber has been trained to condense information in order to keep up with the pace of the lecture, while retaining all essential points of the material.
  • The use of two linked computers allows the student to type questions and comments to the transcriber during class. The transcriber can then read ("voice") for the student, if that is the student's preference.
  • The transcribing process always involves a slight lag time. The student using the service will require a few additional seconds in order to respond to questions and/or participate in class discussions.
  • The student is responsible for copying the information on overheads or written on the board. It is impossible for the student to simultaneously copy the information and watch the transcribing on a computer screen. Therefore, it is very helpful to a student who is deaf/hard of hearing to receive copies of overheads used during lecture in advance.
  • Transcribers are typically added to the Learning Management System (LMS) as “observers” so that they can read posted material, become familiar with vocabulary, and prepare for the class. Instructions for this process are available at Accommodations in Canvas or the OSU Computer Helpdesk at 541-737-3474 can provide assistance if needed.
  • The transcriber must be seated towards the front of the classroom to ensure that the faculty can be easily heard.
  • The transcriber will begin to set up equipment immediately upon arrival in the classroom. If the student is absent, the transcriber occasionally might be rescheduled to a different class. In such cases, the transcriber will break down the equipment and exit the classroom as unobtrusively as possible. Otherwise, the transcriber will stay in the class and transcribe in order to remain current with the vocabulary and concepts used during the class.
  • By the end of the day of the class, the transcriber will edit out non-subject related and confidential material and will provide a copy of the transcript to the student to serve as notes for the class. Students are not permitted to share the transcript with any other person and will not receive transcripts of classes they did not attend except if the absence is documented as disability-related.
  • Students are instructed to delete all transcripts after final grades have been posted and there is no dispute regarding the grades.
  • Transcribers are required to follow the Transcriber Code of Ethics, which include an obligation to keep all assignment related information strictly confidential.

TypeWell Transcriber's Code of Ethics

  • The transcriber will keep strictly confidential all information learned during transcribing assignments.
  • The transcriber will accurately transcribe the meaning of the spoken utterances made by individuals in the class or other transcribing situation.
  • The transcriber will accurately voice comments and questions in reverse interpreting situations.
  • The transcriber will not answer student questions about class content. The transcriber will instead facilitate communication between the instructor and student/reader, by transcribing or voicing as needed.
  • The transcriber will not offer opinions or input of any kind in classes and meetings, even if invited to do so by instructors or others.
  • The transcriber will accept only those assignments for which he or she possesses appropriate skills.
  • The transcriber will strive to continually improve his or her transcribing skills.
  • The transcriber will prevent unauthorized people from using TypeWell to provide services for students and others.

For additional information, please contact the Manager of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Access Services at DHOH.Services@oregonstate.edu or 541-737-3670

Page Updated 11/2014

Sign Language Interpreters

An interpreter facilitates communication for a Deaf or hard of hearing (DHOH) student through the use of sign language or oral interpretation. The Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf, Inc. (RID) and the National Association of the Deaf (NAD) have established a set of ethical standards that define an interpreter's role. Interpreters hired by DAS adhere to the Code of Professional Conduct standards.

The Code of Professional Conduct requires interpreters to:

  • Keep all information from interpreting assignments confidential.
  • Interpret all information accurately and without bias.
  • Refrain from participating in the class in any way.
  • Refrain from expressing personal opinions.

Working with Students and Interpreters

  • To communicate with a Deaf/hard of hearing student, maintain eye contact and address the student directly. If the faculty says to the interpreter "tell him he should...," the interpreter will sign those words exactly. However, the phrase "you should..." directed towards the student will establish a direct line of communication.
  • The interpreter is most often seated in front of the class, opposite the Deaf/hard of hearing student, and will try to maintain a position that allows the student to see the speaker and the interpreter at all times.
  • There will be a few seconds "lag time" between the spoken message and its interpretation into sign language, as well as when the Deaf/hard of hearing student signs and the interpreter begins voicing. Therefore, the Deaf/hard of hearing student will always be slightly slower to respond than the majority of students in the class.
  • The interpreter will interpret environmental noises and may, at times, interpret overheard conversations before class begins.
  • Provide the interpreter a copy of the class syllabus and all handouts which will be used in the class aids the interpreter’s preparation for the class.
  • Students cannot watch the interpreter and media simultaneously; captions allow access to the information presented. Please ensure all media shown in class include captions.
  • If the classroom is to be darkened, be aware that the student must be able to see the interpreter in order to access the information presented in an auditory format. Please adjust the lighting so that the interpreter can be seen by the student.
  • In the absence of an interpreter, don't hesitate to use paper and pencil for communication. It is a widely accepted method.

Requesting an Interpreter

  • DAS has the responsibility to provide access for all academic programs and essential student services. An interpreter may be requested by completing a Custom Request for an Interpreter.
  • Students registered with DAS may submit custom requests through their DAS Online Services profiles.
  • Departments are responsible for requesting interpreting services from DAS for non-essential services and other university events.
    • Please make your request for an interpreter as far in advance as possible. A minimum of 48 hours advance notice is typically required to locate available interpreters.

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact the Manager of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Access Services at DHOH.Services@oregonstate.edu or 541-737-3670

Page Updated 11/2014

FM/Assistive Listening Devices (ALD)

Assistive Listening Device

What is an FM/Assistive Listening Device?

An assistive listening device amplifies sound. The system is comprised of a microphone and a transmitter, worn by the speaker, and a receiver and coupling device, worn by the listener, that transmits sound to the listener's ear or hearing aid. Although not useful for all types of hearing loss, good candidates for the system experience an improved ability to hear both because of amplified sound and because the majority of environmental sounds are masked.

Faculty responsibility

The student will approach the faculty before class to provide the FM  transmitter and microphone, and will pick them up at the end of class. Some classrooms at Oregon State University are "looped" and in those cases, it is not necessary for the faculty member to wear a microphone or transmitter.

The lapel microphone must be placed on a collar or upper lapel area and turned on. Faculty should remember to turn off the microphone when having private conversations. If the microphone has been turned off, please remember to turn it back on before resuming class.

Because the speaker's voice is transmitted directly to the student using the FM system and other noises are screened out, questions and comments from other students in the class cannot be heard. Faculty should repeat those questions and comments so that the student using the FM system can have access to class discussions.

The microphone of an FM system has a limited range. If there will be more than one speaker, such as during a panel discussion, Disability Access Services can provide a conference microphone with a larger range.

Please contact the Manager of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Access Services at DHOH.Services@oregonstate.edu or 541-737-3670 for additional assistance.

Page Updated 11/2014

Real-Time Captioning

Real-Time captioning (CART) is a method of converting spoken language into visual text onto a laptop computer screen. Specialized software and stenography equipment are used in this conversion process.

Real-time captioning services at OSU are provided by a captioner in a remote location. DAS technicians will go to the classroom to assist the faculty and student with setup for the service. The setup generally doesn’t take more than a minute.

The faculty will wear a small lapel microphone that will allow the captioner to hear what is being said in class. The microphone cannot pick up student comments and questions; therefore, it is necessary for the faculty to repeat comments and questions in order for the student using the service to be included in class discussions.

After class, the student is emailed a transcript of what was said. Students are not permitted to share the transcript with any other students, and are asked to delete the transcripts after grades are posted and there are no disputes. Transcripts are considered the intellectual property of the faculty.

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact the Program Manager of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Access Services at (541) 737-3670 (voice) or DHOH.Services@oregonstate.edu (email).

Page Updated 11/2014

Accessible (Captioned) Media

Why Do We Caption Videos?

Captioned videos allows equal access to the content for students who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing (DHOH). Captions are text displayed on the screen to represent what is being said as well as important sound cues. Spoken words in the video are captioned verbatim.

Federal laws (such as the Americans with Disabilities Act) and University policy require this accommodation for eligible individuals. For more information visit the Office of Equal Opportunity and Access website.

In order for media with an auditory component to be accessible for students who are Deaf/hard of hearing, Disability Access Services (DAS) will caption to a copy of the media that was originally produced without captions.

What Faculty Should Expect at the Beginning of the Term

Early Notification of Academic Support Services Email

This email is sent to faculty when eligible students register with DAS online services. It provides information about the kinds of accommodations for which the student is eligible and requests information about videos that the faculty member plans to show in class during the term.

DHOH Video Reminder Letter

If faculty do not respond to the Early Notification email, a reminder email will be sent by Captioning Services. The process of adding captions to videos is time intensive for DAS. Faculty are encouraged to respond promptly as this will allow DAS to complete the captioning process by the planned view date.

If faculty Do NOT intend to show videos

Faculty response is greatly appreciated even if they do not plan to show any media in class.

If no response is given DAS will continue to reach out to the faculty to make sure there are no uncaptioned videos.

If faculty do intend to show videos

It is recommended that faculty verify that the video(s) have or do not have captions. There are a few different ways to gather this information.


Determining whether a video has captions or not

Hardcopies of videos (DVD’s, Blu-Ray’s)

Videos that are closed-captioned often have the symbol "CC" displayed inside a black square on the box of the video. Most classrooms on campus have equipment that allows the use of closed-captioned videos/DVD’s/Blu-ray’s.

Please note that although most DVD’s/Blu-Ray’s now have subtitles, English subtitles are not always available. We recommend that the faculty check the DVD/Blu-Ray in advance to determine if the media contains English subtitles. Faculty should contact the DAS office if in need of assistance.

Online video content

Most online media players have an option to turn on closed captions. There is generally a button that can be clicked to turn captions on. The button will have the “CC” symbol. Please note that many YouTube videos have the option to display “Automatic Captions”. This is not an acceptable accommodation because of its high inaccuracy. DAS recommends that faculty follow the instructions in the captioning notification email and provide DAS with links to the media for inspection.

Videos without Captions

Once a video has been determined to not have acceptable/no captions, DAS will begin the process of creating the captioned copy. This is a time intensive process and requires adequate time for DAS to complete. It’s imperative that faculty start communicating with Captioning Services as soon as possible after receiving the captioning notification email. The details of the captioning process and timeline is found in this email. If faculty plans on showing a hardcopy of a video DAS can send a DAS staff member to retrieve the video and start the captioning process. This includes making a copy of the video. Once the copy has been made, DAS will return the original to the faculty. This generally happens within 48 hours.

Turning on Captions - Hardcopy

For videos that are delivered in a hard copy format (DVD, Blu-ray) faculty should not have to turn on captions. DAS will deliver the captioned copy to the faculty prior to the start of the class. The captions will be embedded on the disk and will play alongside the video. If faculty is using a DAS approved VHS tape, captioning can be turned on using the “CC” button on the VHS player. For more help on in-classroom equipment please contact Classroom Technology Services.

Turning on Captions - Online

In most cases the media will be hosted on Oregon States MediaSpace (online) and should have captions turned on by default. If the video plays and no captions appear, please click on the “CC” button and select “DAS-English”. The link to access the video will be sent to the faculty by Captioning Services prior to the start of the class.

Captioning Timeline

Captioning content is a time intensive process. In order to ensure media accessibility please review the following timelines.

  • For videos under 10 minutes, please provide 72 hours prior to show date
  • For videos 10-20 minutes, please provide 5 business days prior to show date
  • For videos 20-60+ minutes, please provide 14 business days prior to show date

Working with DAS through the captioning process

Your primary contacts will be Captioning Services and the Assistive Technology Manager. Captioning Services will communicate with faculty on updates and answer any questions or concerns the faculty may have. The most important factor in communicating with Captioning Services is for faculty to respond to the initial Notification Email as soon as possible to get the process started.
For questions or concerns please contact: captioning.services@oregonstate.edu or the Assistive Technology Manager at 541-737-3666.

Accessible Media

In order to ensure access to instructional materials, all media must be captioned when being shown in classes in which students who are deaf/hard of hearing are enrolled. If faculty receives an email from DAS regarding a student eligible for captioned media, faculty should contact Captioning Services at captioning.services@oregonstate.edu as soon as possible. DAS will add captions to a copy of the media, but the process is time-intensive and generally requires a minimum of two weeks to complete a one hour video/DVD.

Information that faculty will be asked to provide:

  • the title of the video/DVD/Blu-ray
  • the length of the video/DVD/Blu-ray
  • whether the video/DVD/Blu-ray is closed captioned or subtitled
  • the owner of the video/DVD/Blu-ray (private party, department, Valley Library collection, etc.)
  • the anticipated show date for the video/DVD/Blu-ray
  • the link for any YouTube clips you plan to use

DAS staff will make arrangements to pick up the video/DVD/Blu-ray from the specified location. The original copy will generally be returned within 48 hours. The captioned media will be made available before the planned view date.

 

 

Page Updated 11/2014

Glossary of Terms

Age of Onset – The age at which a person starts to lose hearing.

ALDs (Assistive listening devices) – Devices that use a microphone positioned close to the speaker's mouth to transmit speech to the receiver worn by the student, either via a loop, headphones, or an ear bud. ALDs help overcome the problems of distance and surrounding noise.

ALD – Assistive Listening Device for personal use.

ALS – Assistive Listening System for groups of people.

Amplification – The use of hearing aids or any other mechanics used by a person with a hearing impairment to amplify sound.

Amplified Phone – Phones equipped with volume controls on the handset.

ASL (American Sign Language) – A natural visual-gestural language with syntax, structure, and grammar rules different from English.

Audiogram – A graph used to record the results of a hearing evaluation.

Audiology – The science of hearing, including the evaluation of hearing impairments and the rehabilitation of people with hearing impairments.

Closed-Captioning Decoder – A device which allows closed transcribing to be seen on a television screen.

Compatible Phone – A phone which generates an induction signal that can be picked up by a hearing aid telecoil. Federal law requires that all corded phones sold in the United States must be hearing aid compatible.

Conductive hearing loss – The loss of sound sensitivity produced by abnormalities of the outer and/or middle ear.

Cued Speech – The use of handshapes and placements around the mouth to aid in the recognition of spoken words – used in some parts of the country extensively, and not much in other areas.

Cued Speech Transliterator – Transliterators translate from spoken language to the visual mode of communication Cued Speech. Transliterators provide real-time access to all information occurring in the classroom.

Cumulative Trauma Disorder – A painful physical condition, such as Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, that is caused by overuse and repetitive motion without sufficient breaks for resting.

Deaf Person – One whose hearing loss makes it impossible for him/her to understand speech and language with or without the use of hearing aids.

Decibel – A unit for expressing the intensity (loudness) of sounds.

Degree of Hearing Loss – The extent of hearing impairment usually categorized as "slight," mild," "moderate," "severe," or "profound."

Dual Party Relay – Three way telephone access system linking Deaf and Hard of Hearing callers using an agent who has access to both parties.

Etiology of Hearing Loss – The cause of a hearing loss.

Frequency – It is the subjective impression of highness or lowness of a sound (pitch).

Hard of Hearing Person – One whose hearing loss makes it difficult, but not impossible, or him/her to understand speech and language with or without the use of hearing aids.

Interpreter – A trained professional, fluent in both English and American Sign Language, who is bound by a code of ethics to facilitate communication between deaf and hearing persons.

Notetaker – a person, typically a student in the class, that takes notes and provides them to the student with a disability. Notes include lecture information, diagrams and notes from class as well as threads of class discussions.

Open-Captioning – Text that appears on the television screen that conveys the spoken information – does not require a decoder.

Oral Interpreting – A form of interpreting in which the interpreter mouths without voice is being said so the person who is deaf or hard of hearing can speechread more easily.

Real-Time Transcribing/Captioning – Transcribing that is provided simultaneously as a spoken word using a computerized software program.

Residual Hearing – Any usable hearing that a person may have.

RID – Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf, the organization responsible for testing and certifying interpreters, and the formation of the Code of Ethics.

Section 504 – Section 504 is part of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Pub. L. No. 93-112, as amended). It protects the civil rights of people with disabilities in many environments including college settings.

Sensorioneural Hearing Loss – The loss of sound sensitivity produced by abnormalities of the inner ear or the eighth cranial nerve pathway beyond the inner ear to the brain.

Speechreading (also known as lipreading) – The process of watching a person's mouth movements and facial expressions to ascertain what is being said. Speechreading ability varies from person to person and can be influenced by factors such as the amount of useable hearing a person has and their knowledge of spoken English. Other factors can include the amount of light and the noise level of the environment.

"T" Switch – A switch on a hearing aid that is compatible with telephone use, allowing the user to cut off all competing sounds.

Tactile Interpreting – A form of interpreting with individuals who are deafblind which involves them receiving information by placing their hands on the interpreter's hands during the interpretation.

Text Relay – A free service which provides operators, called communication assistants (CAs), who facilitate phone calls between hearing and deaf or hard of hearing persons. The CA types what the hearing person says for the deaf or hard of hearing person to read. The CA voices what the deaf or hard of hearing person types to the hearing person. Relay can be done over the phone (using a TTY or TDD) or over the Internet (IP Relay).

TTY or TDD – A telecommunication device used by persons who are deaf who cannot communicate on the telephone. A typewriter-like unit prints the conversation on a screen or paper so that it can be read, and enables the user to type responses back on the keyboard. A TTY must connect with another TTY or a computer.

Type of Loss – The nature of a hearing impairment, usually classified as "conductive," "sensori-neural," or "mixed."

Text messaging devices – Mobile devices that allow simultaneous two-way text communication. Some more common brands are Blackberry, Ogo, and Sidekick.

Video Relay – A free online service which provides on-screen interpreters to facilitate phone calls between hearing and deaf or hard of hearing persons.

Notetaking

Providing notetaker assistance is a cooperative effort between the professor and the DAS Office.

DAS makes every effort to identify a notetaker for your class before the beginning of the term. In some cases, DAS may need faculty assistance in order to recruit a notetaker. We greatly appreciate your assistance in the following:

  1. Please contact us at Notetaking.Services@oregonstate.edu if you can provide the student(s) with complete lecture notes, or if the lecture notes are posted online via Blackboard, so that we may inform the students. Please note: some students (due to their disability) may require a notetaker in addition to the notes you provide. When this is the case you may recieve an email asking for your assistance in recruiting a notetaker.
  2. If lecture notes are not available, you can assist the DAS office by identifying a student in your class who you believe would be a competent and dependable notetaker. Please refer all interested students to sign up online at http://ds.oregonstate.edu Please note: Notetakers are assigned on a first-come, first-serve basis. Your referral will be taken into strong consideration, but may not be assigned as the notetaker for this class if another student requests the assignment first.
  3. If you cannot recommend a student to become a notetaker, please make the following announcement in class or through a Blackboard announcement, not mentioning the name(s) of the student(s):
    There is a student in our class who needs a copy of the class notes. The pay for providing notes is usually $50 to $100. If you have a 2.5 GPA and take accurate, legible notes, please sign up at the DAS website, ds.oregonstate.edu.

Feel free to print the following information sheet to distribute to interested notetakers: Notetaker How-To's

Potential notetakers can also come to the Disability Access Services office in Kerr Admin A200 to sign up as a Notetaker, and to receive further instructions regarding the DAS Notetaking. Occasionally, multiple students sign up as the potential Notetaker. Selection is made on a first-come, first-served basis.

If we are not successful in recruiting a notetaker, we may request a copy of faculty notes or loan a digital recorder in order to capture the lecture.

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact Notetaking Services at 541-737-3672 (voice) or Notetaking.Services@oregonstate.edu (email).

Updated 09/2015

Classroom Access

Much of Oregon State University is located within a historic district. Some of our historic buildings present accessibility challenges, which require relocation of classes or placement of specialized furniture. Classroom access may also require an additional aid (lab assistant, classroom assistant, library assistant, etc). Classroom access accommodations are generally provided by Disability Access Services.

Physical Accommodations

Accessible Classroom/Classroom Relocation

This is exactly what it sounds like. Some of our classrooms are inaccessible or impossible to use for students with certain disabilities. DAS works with the registrar's office and the faculty member to find a new location for the class.

How Faculty Can Help

Please be specific when putting in your classroom requests with the registrar's office, so that if your class needs to be relocated, we choose a location that meets your needs.

Accessible Computer

While accessibility addresses more than physical access, this particular accommodation refers specifically to how physically accessible the computer desk is. Can the height be adjusted? Is there enough room underneath for a wheelchair or a footstool as necessary? Contact DAS or the Office of Equal Opportunity and Access (OEA) for information about how to make accessible stations in your computer and science labs.

Accessible Fieldtrips

OSU is responsible for ensuring access to all facets of learning - that includes making sure fieldtrips and other class outings are accessible.

How Faculty Can Help

If you have a student who has a mobility concern, make sure you check the accessibility of your class trip destinations before the trip. If you will be visiting a business or other building, are there accessible routes and entrances? For outdoor trips, are there paved or other wheelchair accessible paths? How are you getting to the destination? Can the student access the transportation?

Foot Stools

Chair - No Arms or Padded with Lumbar Support

Some students need chairs that provide them with additional back support, padding, or space. This furniture is managed by DAS. You can recognize it either by the ADA furniture signs or the small AeroScout location tags placed on each piece of furniture.

How Faculty Can Help

Faculty members often like our chairs - they are more comfortable than most classroom furniture, and we do not mind them being used, so long as they are in place for our students when they are needed. Please do not use or block the DAS chairs when there is a student in your class who receives a lumbar support chair as an accommodation.

Podium in Class

DAS provided podiums are actually small desks on wheels that can be quickly and easily raised to a standing position.

Preferential Seating

Some students with disabilities need to sit in a specific part of the classroom due to access, allergies, medical need, visibility, volume, etc. Most students are able to get a seat in an acceptable location on their own. However, particularly in large or crowded classrooms, students may work with DAS and faculty to reserve a seat.

Table

DAS provided tables are large and height-adjustable, with no obstructions in the center. This allows students using DAS lumbar support chairs and students using wheelchairs to have a table that they can adjust to the height they need.

How Faculty Can Help

These height adjustable tables are often pushed to the sides or the teaching areas of the classroom over time. DAS works to make sure that the tables are placed properly at the beginning of each term. Many of the students who need these tables cannot move them. Please be aware that a student may need assistance, if someone in a previous class has moved or blocked a table.

In-Class Assistants

Classroom Assistant

DAS occasionally provides an in-class assistant for students. Classroom assistants are assigned for a variety of reasons, but they are meant only to be the hands or eyes of the student they are helping. They will not participate in class, and should not coach or prompt the student. They are only in class to perform tasks as the student directs them.

In Class Services Animal

Service Animals are specially trained to perform a specific task. The task could be one of many, from acting as a guide for someone who is blind or has low vision, to warning of an oncoming medical emergency such as a seizure. If you have questions about service animals in classroom or lab settings, please contact us.

Lab Assistant

DAS occasionally provides a lab assistant for students. Lab assistants are assigned for a variety of reasons, but they are meant only to be the hands or eyes of the student they are helping. They will not coach or prompt the student. They are only in the lab to perform tasks as the student directs them.

Personal Care Attendants (PCAs)

Oregon State University (OSU) is committed to providing access to all individuals. One way that OSU does this is by acknowledging that some students may require a Personal Care Attendant (PCA) while in the learning environment.

Please be aware:

  • OSU does not provide PCA services
  • PCA’s are hired, paid and employed by the student they are assisting
  • PCA’s are not classroom or lab assistants
  • PCA’s are required to abide by all OSU policies, including but not limited to the Student Code of Conduct
  • PCA’s are only permissible in the classroom or lab when the student is in attendance
  • PCA’s may not be enrolled in the class they are working in and will not receive academic credit for the class

A student bringing a PCA to OSU must register with Disability Access Services (DAS) prior to the PCA attending classes with the student. A student must identify the classes the PCA will attend with the student on DAS Online Services each term.

If a student will require a PCA while living in the residence halls the student must register with DAS and request housing accommodations through University Housing and Dining Services (UHDS).

Refer to the PCA guidelines for more detailed information regarding student, PCA and Disability Access Services (DAS) roles and responsibilities.

Flexibility with Attendance/Assignments

Students are expected and encouraged to attend class and meet deadlines for assignments and tests. Faculty have the right to establish attendance and late work policies. However, if a student has a disability with random or cyclical acute episodes that may occasionally impact her/his ability to attend class and complete tests or assignments at the scheduled time, flexibility in attendance/assignments may be considered an appropriate accommodation. The number of allowable absences and length of assignment extensions depends on the interactive or participatory nature of a course, or is based on department, college or accrediting agency rules.

DAS has created guidelines for OSU students & faculty to help navigate this accommodation. Please see the detailed policy below. A PDF version is available online.


Disability Related Flexibility in Attendance/Assignments Policy and Guidelines

Attendance and Assignments Deadlines:

Students are expected and encouraged to attend classes on a regular basis. Faculty have the right to establish attendance policies. The number of allowable absences depends on the interactive or participatory nature of a course, or is based on department, college or accrediting agency rules. Therefore, attendance policies are set by faculty at the college or departmental level.

Students are expected and encouraged to meet all deadlines for assignments and tests. Faculty have the right to establish late work policies.

What does Flexibility in Attendance/Assignments mean?

Students who may not adhere to an attendance policy or may miss an assignment deadline or test due to circumstances directly related to a disability may seek an accommodation. The process for requesting this accommodation is through Disability Access Services (DAS). All requests are considered individually.

When are Flexibility in Attendance/Assignment Deadlines Appropriate?

Some disabilities are episodic in nature with random or cyclical acute episodes and as a result the disability may occasionally impact the students’ ability to attend class, complete an assignment or take an exam at the scheduled time. In cases such as these flexibility in attendance/assignments may be considered an appropriate accommodation.

If you are contacted by DAS about possible flexibility in your attendance/assignments as a possible accommodation, we will seek an understanding in the role attendance plays in the design of your course. As well a basic understanding of the impact or role timing of assignments and exams play in the interactive or participatory nature of a course.

Specifically, we will be exploring:

  • What is the course attendance policy? What do the course description and syllabus say?
  • What method is used to calculate the final grade? (attendance, assignments, exams, etc.)
  • Is the attendance policy and late work or missed exams policy applied consistently? Are there exceptions to the policy made for extenuating circumstances, such as athletic travel or religious observation?
  • How much interaction is there between the instructor and students and among students?
  • Do student contributions constitute a significant component of the learning process?
  • Does the design of the course rely on student participation as a significant method for learning? Attendance and/or their assignment (project) contributions.
  • Is there content only offered in class?
  • To what degree does a student’s failure to attend class or do an assignment on time compromise the educational experience of other students in the class?

If an accommodation is determined to be reasonable, DAS will work with you and your student to clearly specify:

  • How and when your student should inform you he/she will miss class
  • How your student will make up missed assignments and/or exams
  • The number of absences (beyond what any student is allowed) that would be reasonable
  • If it is reasonable for online discussion expectations to be modified due to disability related reasons and under what conditions
  • If it is reasonable to extend the window for completing online exams or assignments
  • Whether a drop, withdraw or incomplete may be appropriate based on your students situation

What is the process?

  1. The Office of Disability Access Services (DAS) determines that the accommodation is reasonable. We explain to students that this does not mean that they can miss as many classes as they want. Also, the student is responsible for completing all coursework.
  2. DAS will send a Disability Related Flexibility in Attendance/Assignments Agreement to faculty with guidance for faculty to fill out the agreement. Any questions should be directed to DAS (541-737-4098). The faculty member should sign and return the agreement to DAS within 3 business days.

    Tip: A general rule to consider for determining a reasonable timeframe for a makeup or postponement of an assignment, paper, exam or quiz is the time equivalent to that, which was missed. In certain courses, it may be appropriate to consider an alternative assignment, reading or project to make up for missed class discussions or projects. Other examples of how disability absences might be accommodated may include the ability to turn in assignment/papers late without a grade penalty or the ability to make up any assignments, quizzes or exams that have been missed without a grade penalty.

  3. DAS will send the agreement to the student once it is received from the faculty member. The student will sign and send the agreement to DAS within 3 business days of receipt. DAS, the student, and the faculty member will all receive a copy of the agreement.
  4. If the student has concerns or questions regarding what the faculty has indicated in the agreement DAS will resolve these issues with conversations between faculty and/or students.

Important Information:

  • This accommodation is not a blanket reason to miss class.
  • Faculty are still responsible for this accommodation even if they delay in responding to DAS. DO NOT WAIT!
  • Some students register late in the term and some wait to respond to the need to sign the agreement. In these cases, faculty are not expected to provide retroactive accommodations. However, it may still be helpful to have this information, even at a late point in the term.
  • At no time is the student required to present the faculty member with medical documentation verifying his/her disability related absence for this accommodation.
  • If the absences meet or exceed 50% of those agreed upon in the Flexibility in Attendance/Assignments Agreement, DAS should be informed. This will allow DAS to be of assistance in answering questions about the accommodations from both the student and the faculty member.
  • Absences that are not related to the effects of a disability are not included in this accommodation (i.e. absences due to a common illness, car trouble, etc.) and should be addressed according to the syllabus stated attendance/absence policy. The student is responsible for following the faculty member’s syllabus regarding absences due to non-disability related issues.
  • An accommodation in attendance is not reasonable if regular attendance is essential to the course and/or curriculum.
  • Faculty are not obligated to re-teach material missed due to not attending class.
  • Not every course component can be provided an extension.
  • Students have the responsibility for completing all class work and should be held to the same standard as all other students.

Reasonable and Unreasonable Accommodations

A reasonable accommodation includes actions to eliminate or reduce physical or instructional barriers to learning. Accommodations are individualized to a student’s needs, which can include physical accessibility and participation in course activities.

Accommodations are reasonable unless they:

  • Alter or remove essential requirements.
  • Fundamentally alter the nature of the program.
  • Impose undue financial or administrative burden.
  • Pose a threat to others.

The determination that an accommodation is unreasonable is an institutional decision that must meet legal and educational requirements. Though the academic judgments involved in such decisions are typically the prerogative of the academic unit involved, those judgments must be made within legal parameters. Therefore, such determinations require collaboration between faculty, the academic department and DAS. Faculty members may not unilaterally determine that an accommodation is unreasonable.

Accommodation Disputes

Faculty can dispute the accommodation if it is felt the accommodation is unreasonable per the definition in “Unreasonable Accommodations” above. If a faculty member is concerned about providing an accommodation, the concern should be raised with DAS promptly preferably before the term begins or by the next business day after receiving an accommodation notice.

DAS shall immediately attempt informal resolution of the matter. If informal resolution efforts are unsuccessful, DAS shall notify the student of his/her right to file a grievance with the Equal Opportunity and Access (EOA). EOA will attempt to resolve the dispute as quickly as possible and within the term in which the issue was raised. Unless there is an appreciable threat to the safety of the student with a disability or others (with EOA concurrence), the student should be allowed to proceed under the proposed accommodation until the matter is resolved. EOA will comply with the time limits prescribed by OSU's Discrimination Complaint Procedures.

Download and print the Accommodation Dispute Form (pdf).

Updated 09/2015

Additional Information

Thank you for reading the DAS Faculty & Staff Guidelines. Below are some additional tips and resources to help better support students with disabilities.

Please contact DAS with any questions or comments. We are always happy to hear from you!

Disability Access Services
A200 Kerr Admin Bldg
Corvallis, OR 97331
Email: Disability.Services@oregonstate.edu

General Awareness

  • Be careful not to make assumptions about an individual based on his or her disability.
  • Life experiences, combined with the nature and duration of a disability, strongly influence the educational adaptations developed by people with disabilities.
  • People with disabilities are impacted in a variety of different ways. Two people with the same disability may require very different accommodations.
  • A person with a disability may appreciate assistance. However, be sure to ask first.
  • Individuals with non-visible disabilities have needs that are just as real as those of persons with visible disabilities.
  • Expect students with a disability to meet the same standards of performance as all other students. They are here because of their abilities, not their disabilities.
  • All information about a person's disability is confidential. If having a discussion with a student about his/her needs, move to a private area.
  • Additional information is available in the Disability Access Services training module.

Communication

  • Use "person first" language. (e.g., person who uses a wheelchair, student who is blind).
  • Speak directly to an individual with a disability and not to an interpreter or an attendant.
  • Individuals who are blind are not generally hard of hearing. Don't raise your voice when speaking.
  • When speaking with persons who have speech impairments, do not finish their sentences to save time and do not pretend to have understood what they're saying if you haven't. It is fine to ask someone to repeat themselves.
  • When speaking for any extended period of time with a person who uses a wheelchair, sit down (do not bend or squat) so that you are at the same level.

External Resources